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20130113
20130121
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of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sensible. we should not be doing this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want t
' medical facilities, and help keep the economy moving by funding necessary repairs, small business loans, and recovery aid for businesses of all sizes. my committee thoroughly examined the emergency request, listened to the needs of the people and the region, and assessed the most pressing needs to determine the funding levels paid in this bill. we crafted this legislation responsibly, giving the administration's request and the senate passed bill a hard scrub to eliminate unnecessary spending. we have removed objectionable provisions added by the senate and have adjusted funding levels to make the best use of taxpayer dollars. as we know, we face precarious fiscal times and it's essential that congress make responsible decisions to ensure efficient and effective spending. taking cues from previous efforts we have included important oversight measures to prevent abuse and ensure that federal agencies are using these funds effectively and appropriately. this is not the first major natural disaster nor unfortunately will it be the last. one of the great attributes of the american people ha
is greater than our nation's economy exceeding our g.d.p. and we have on the floor floor toda legislation that calls upon our children and grandchildren even greater burdens of debt. it's time to end the credit card economics. we simply cannot afford to spend money that we are borrowing from countries like china on-line items we don't need and constitution isn't authorized to spend. my amendment strips one line item out of this bill. this is really low-hanging fruit. the sandy relief effort was increased by $1 million to boost the legal services corporation, massacre aiding as disaster relief and i thought we had a ban on earmarks in this congress. why is a bailout for new york lawyers emergency hurricane relief, even if you believe this is a legitimate government program which i don't, by the way, how can you argue that spending on lawyers is a legitimate emergency spending? let me say again, for $-- we are $16 trillion in debt, we are $16 trillion in debt, america. we simply cannot afford to continue like this. we cannot keep spending on money we don't have on things we can't afford and
or to radically, giving too much money into many loans purses to few. banks are important part of the economy and the finance new job growth and the ability of people to buy a home, which is the largest single investment that they will make. we really need for them to be there to help the consumers and businesses finance their operations. the balancing act is not being too strict so that they will draw in and not land but not being too lax. that is a fine line. we shall we shallthe cfpb has achieve that with these rules. financial institutions will complain about any regulation because they did not want to be subject to kinds of rules that instruct them in how to do their business. when you read the complaints from the financial industry, i would say we have to take some of those with a grain of salt. host: gretchen morgenson is the "the new york times" assistant business and financial editor. she was co-author of "reckless endangerment.' guest: who basically were the interco parties in creating the crisis decades later. host: don is next from clifton, virginia. caller: a good time to segue t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4